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Norway´s National Parks are regulated by the laws of nature. Nature decides both how and when to do things. National Parks are established in order to protect large natural areas - from the coast to the mountains. This is done for our sake, for generations to come and for the benefit of nature itself.




REISA NATIONAL PARK

County: Troms

Established: 1986

Size: 803 km2





A canyon with mighty water nature

For thousands of years the Reisa river has cut the long canyon which forms the focus of Reisa National Park. Narrow valleys and ravines, mighty waterfalls, river gorges and potholes dominate the park, which was established to protect a practically undisturbed area. The flora and fauna include more species than most of Northern Norway in total.




By riverboat to the wilderness

The most common way to get to the National Park is by riverboat from Bilto/Saraelv. Once inside the park there are several opportunities for hiking, with some unstaffes tourist cabins, and marked trails that are part ofÊ the "Nordkalottruta" trail. You can catch salmon, sea trout and sea char in the lower part of the valley, and perch, burbot, pike and powan higher up. There´s also pike in the Raisjavri lake. Hunting is possible in the area. Remember fishing and hunting licenses.




A cleft in the plateau

In the course of several thousand years, the Reisa river has cut a deep cleft in the mountain plateau to create the long fertile valley of Reisadalen. Great waterfalls cascade into the valley - the 269 metres high Mollis falls are particularly impressive, and at the Imo waterfalls two tributaries cascade down the vertical granite face to join the main river in a narrow ravine where numerous potholes have been scoured out. North of Imo, the valley sides rise precipitously to create a deep canyon.

Two billion years of geological history can be read in the sheer walls of rock beside the river: granite and gneiss bedrock at he base, covered with a 200 metres thick deposit of shales and sandstone (known geologically as the Dividal group), over which other rock types were pushed or slid into place 400 mill. years ago. At Avvekl¿fta the whole sequence is clearly visible. Further up the valley, the landscape changes into an open sparse moorland.




From forested floodplain to bleak moorland

Great variation in the geology and landscape provide the basis for a wide diversity of wildlife. Here we find more species of plants and birds - especially eastern and northern species - than almost anywhere else in the north. On the floodplain, the deciduous woodland is luxuriant and the rich undergrowth tempts the hiker with wild currants and berries, while among the willows higher up, the pretty blue flowers of "Sharp-flowered Jacob´s Ladder" are a common sight.




North Norways varied animal life

Steep clifs, dense woodland and inaccessible plateaus provide birds of prey with an excellent habitat. The rough-legged buzzard is in the majority, but fell-walkers should keep an eye open for golden eagles, gyr falcons and kestrels, all of which are found here. The national park and adjacent fells are home to the wolverine, lynx and arctic fox.

The Saami name Nj‡llaévzi means "the cleft of the arctic fox", which suggests that there have been foxes here. In the winter they survive mainly on the scraps left by wolverines, especially reindeer flesh. Norway´s largest predator, the brown bear, is occasionally seen in the national park.




Three different cultures meet

Three different cultures are found in Reisadalen: Reindeer herders and settlers of Saami, Finnish and Norwegian origins have all made use of the area and left their mark in names and in the cultural heritage. At least as far back as the 16th century, migrating Finns came and settled and it was probably these who brought the characteristic river-boat to Reisadalen. Originally a pole-driven craft, it is now motorized.

The valley and the surrounding mountains have always been important for hunting, trapping and fishing, and grouse are still caught by snares in the old manner. Pinewood was used as building material and for making tar. The sale of tar provided extra income for most of the farms in the valley.

Tar-production continued into the 20th century and remains of tarpits can still be seen. Today the National Park and adjacent area provide grazing for domestic reindeer from Kautokeino from the spring to the autumn.







OPPLAND


Dovrefjell - Sunndalsfjella
Jotunheimen
Ormtjernkampen
Rondane



HEDMARK


Dovre
Femundsmarka
Forollhogna
Gutulia
Rondane



BUSKERUD


Hardangervidda


TELEMARK


Hardangervidda


HORDALAND


Hardangervidda
Folgefonna



SOGN & FJORDANE


Jostedalsbreen
Jotunheimen



MØRE & ROMSDAL


Dovrefjell - Sunndalsfjella


SØR TRØNDELAG


Dovrefjell - Sunndalsfjella
Femundsmarka
Forollhogna
Skarvan and Roltdalen



NORD TRØNDELAG


Blåfjella-Skjækerfjella
Børgefjell
Lierne
Skarvan and Roltdalen



NORDLAND


Børgefjell
Junkerdal
Møysalen
Rago
Saltfjellet - Svartisen



TROMS


Reisa
Øvre Dividal
Ånderdalen



FINNMARK


Stabbursdalen
Øvre Anarjohka
Øvre Pasvik



SVALBARD


Forlandet
Nordenskiøld Land
Nordre Isfjorden
Nordvest-Spitsbergen
Sassen-Bunsow Land
Sør-Spitsbergen